Breast cancer lesson number 44: Living with cancer doesn’t just mean being treated for it

It’s official. I am being stalked by cancer. It is not enough for me to be diagnosed with the illness. Everywhere I go, I am bombarded with adverts, campaigns and television plot storylines. I can’t even go on Facebook without seeing the latest no make-up selfie. I keep asking myself has it always been this prevalent? The answer is probably yes. I just wasn’t looking.

Have you ever found that when you learn about something new, you suddenly find yourself seeing it everywhere? For me, it started with a train journey after biopsy day. Suddenly, it seemed every carriage brought with it a message about cancer. After I was diagnosed, I felt like every advert break on TV was talking to me in some way. Is it strange that the first film I watch on returning home from hospital ends up with a bit of cancer at the end? Is it stranger that the book my mum was reading at the time took a turn towards breast cancer halfway through? Even the TV soap Eastenders decided to get in on the action – just as Hayley was saying her goodbyes on Coronation Street.

Interestingly, I am not alone. Apparently I am experiencing what is known as ‘frequency illusion’ or the Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon. What this means is that while you think you are seeing things more often, it is likely that whatever it is you’re seeing has been there all along. A lot of discussion on this subject surrounds the discovery of things that you’ve never heard of before (a town name or a song title for example).Ok, I appreciate cancer isn’t new to me. But, until 17 January, it was a generic term to describe a serious illness in different parts of the body. I have known loved ones who have been affected by it, but I wasn’t being reminded of it every day. My cancer radar is now in overdrive. Trust me, if there is a cancer story out there, I am probably going to be drawn to it.

With cancer constantly beating a drum in my head, I have been truly touched by the stories of those undergoing treatment and the way in which people have chosen to raise awareness. Only last night was I watching an inspirational BBC3 programme Kris: Dying to live about Coppafeel founder Kris Hallenga. Diagnosed at 23 with stage IV breast cancer, she has had to learn to live each day with cancer as her boss. Now 28, I think she’s doing a pretty amazing job. Then you have Lisa Lynch. Soon to be made famous in a TV programme with Sheridan Smith playing Lisa, the dark humour in her book The C Word really moved me. While she may have lost her battle (after being originally diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer), her story lives on through her words. She will continue to inspire those going through treatment and becoming all-too-familiar with hospital corridors!

The truth is, cancer is everywhere. It affects us all. One in three people will get it in their lifetime. Cancer stories move us because they’re real. They’re being played out in your next door neighbour’s house, in your extended family, at work or, even worse, at home. We are all living with cancer and the more stories that can be told, the more awareness we can raise and the more comfort we can bring to those facing the illness.

As an aside, you may be wondering why I haven’t done a no make-up selfie yet. Initially troubled by the whole concept (my blog is positive not political hence the radio silence), I was delighted to see how much money it raised. I have donated about three times already and am storing up my selfie for when my hair falls out (I don’t really wear make-up, so it would just be a picture of me currently, and nobody needs to see that). That is the true face of cancer and I’m afraid no amount of make-up will ever really conceal its effects (a good wig, yes, but more on that after wig shopping)!

Cancer, I’d like to think one day you will just be another zodiac sign. But until then, I say bring it on (not more disease, just stories)! I would like to be stalked. I want everyone to know just how mean you are. I also want everyone to know that while you do so much harm to this world, destroying lives and ripping families apart, you have inadvertently created millions of strong, beautiful and inspiring people. You should be recognised for your contribution to the arts, the amount of amazing words and films for which you are responsible.

Yes, it would be great to think we could live in a world without cancer plotlines. But, while there is cancer, I want to be moved and touched by each and every one.

One comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s