Breast cancer lesson number 43: Cure, Help, Empower, Me to Overcome = CHEMO

With the embryos now packed away in the freezer, one pixie haircut and one PICC line insertion are all that stand between me and chemotherapy. Cycle number one is planned in for next Wednesday and, I must confess, I’m already trying to imagine the side effects. Up to now, apart from a bit of pain, a lot of needles and enough drugs to stock a pharmacy, I have felt well. A week today, whether I like it or not, that’s all about to change.

They say the fear of chemo is often worse than the act of going through it. All I can say is, let’s hope they’re right (and that it’s not the cancer equivalent of ‘childbirth is fine’ so we all go into it with blind optimism). I have a rather vivid imagination and it’s currently in overdrive. This is in no small way to do with the consent form – or should I say dossier of potentially debilitating side effects. Beware drugs that come with consent forms! After seven pages listing out all the life-changing conditions I might end up with, it began to hit me that this is no normal prescription drug. This might actually be a bit grim.

For those wanting to know a bit more, chemotherapy is a systemic treatment using anti-cancer drugs. Its aim is to go after cancer cells in the whole body (not just the breast) and interfere with their ability to divide and grow. I will be going through what’s called adjuvant chemotherapy. This means it’s an additional treatment to reduce the risk of breast cancer returning after it has been removed (in some cases people have chemo before surgery – known as neo-adjuvant chemo – to slow the growth or shrink a tumour).

So, what awaits me in the chemotherapy chair? I will be undertaking something called the FEC-T regimen. First, I will enjoy three three-week cycles of FEC (lucky me). This is a combination of the following drugs:

1)    Fluorouracil (or 5FU)
2)    Epirubicin (a nice red liquid)
3)    Cyclophosphamide

Then, once I have got used to the way my body reacts to the above drugs, I will  move on to T or Docetaxel (one brand name is Taxotere, hence the letter T). This takes longer to administer and stays in the body longer (it gets better and better). And, I mustn’t forget the supply of anti-sickness drugs and steroids you get thrown in to keep said chemo drugs company.

In truth, the drugs are just words. It’s the list of side effects that leaves an impression. Everyone is different and no one knows how they are going to react. I know I’m strong, I know I’m positive, I know I will work when I can – and my consultant seems to think I’ll be just fine.

Bearing in mind, you probably wouldn’t take a paracetamol if you gave the pill packet too much attention, factsheets and side effects booklets are to be regarded with some caution. I will probably get some side effects, but if I get a lot, I will be more than a little unlucky and will be trading in my body for a better model at the next available opportunity.

The potential effects are many and varied. Rather than plough back through the consent form, here is my edit of the highlights (or lowlights depending on how you look at it):

1)    I will lose my hair: it seems the cold cap that is available will merely delay the inevitable, so I am going to lose my hair in style! Pre-chemo pixie is planned for Saturday and then, by the end of April, it will probably have disappeared. I am not particularly worried about this, am enjoying shopping for hats and am waiting for an opportunity to stand on a cliff with my bald head. Quite fancy not having to shave the rest of my body for months on end and it will, as a friend said, be interesting to see the shape of my head. My only fear? It growing back grey. At 32!

2)    I will get constipation: I doubt I’ll be able to beat eight days after hip surgery (not sure I want to try) so it will be back on the Laxido I’m sure. Whoop! You can also go the other way (now that would be a change!).

3)    I may get an infection: if my white blood cell levels drop, I will be more susceptible to infection. I plan to avoid the Underground where possible and have been acquainted with my new best friend, Mr thermometer. Apparently, if my temperature goes above 38 degrees, I will need to get to the hospital… and fast!

4)    I may vomit: having only vomited a few times in my life, I hope my strong constitution stands me in good stead. I certainly won’t be eating my favourite foods around the sessions, just in case I see them again ­– and then never want to eat them again. I hear the anti-sickness drugs can be effective but they can cause constipation (see 2).

5)    I may get fatigue: it’s fairly common, and the cumulative effect of all the treatment may take its toll.I plan to walk as often as I can and, of course, not operate any machinery if I feel tired (maybe just a kettle, a TV, a computer and a mobile phone).

6)    My sense of taste could change: I must say, I am intrigued by this side effect. Some say things taste like metal (yum) and others say they become addicted to sweet things. I better make sure I don’t overdo the baking, just in case. Let’s hope I don’t get too many ulcers and sores (another joyous side effect), so I can actually eat something.

7)    Docetaxel can cause bone pain: If it’s anything like my original hip pain or nerve pain, I will be willing these cycles to end!

8)    My hands or feet might start to tingle: This would be another treat from the wonderful T and is known as peripheral neuropathy. I am quite fond of my hands.

9)    Chemo brain: Chemo, if you’re listening, please don’t take my memory. I love remembering birthdays and running through my to-dos in my head. Take my memory and you take a big chunk of me. That’s not part of the deal.

All that, and I haven’t got started on heart problems, fluid retention, sun sensitivity, allergic reactions, blood clots, infertility or nail changes (or the side effects of Zoladex, the drug already in my system).

The truth is, by putting it out here in post form I wish to now close the A-Z of scary chemo effects. I will smile as the red liquid approaches. I will smile at my chemo nurses. I will smile as I write my first post-chemo blog. I will keep smiling until one of these things makes me smile no more.

As of this moment, I plan to take control of chemo. In an attempt to go down smiling (or better, not go down at all), I am in the market for chemo tips (I will write a post compiling them all later this week). Thanks to some beautiful friends, I have sleep caps, an inflatable bath pillow, nail varnish and queasy drops ticked off the list. I have senna. I have a toweling robe with which to dry myself and am on a mission to find the tastiest ginger nut. If you have a tip you think may help me stay strong and positive, please get in touch. I am willing to try, experiment and do anything (within reason), if I end up with a big smile on my face.

I was going to call this blog post ‘Know your enemy’, but when I finished writing it, I realised it’s wrong to call chemo the enemy. Cancer is the enemy and chemo is one of good guys (even if it likes to knock you down a few times along the way).

Here’s my deal. I’ll give you my hair, but you’ll have to fight me for everything else.

5 comments

  1. It sounds like you are well prepared… Hope all goes well and as you say everyone has a different reaction… If positivity gets you through then you have it in bucket loads so that must be good!…. Helen

    1. Thanks Helen. Am banking on a bit of positivity getting me through. By the way, your blog is such a wonderful source of information for Lymphoedema sufferers. Have a lovely day. Jackie x

  2. I wish you the very best of luck. When my husband went through chemotherapy we thought we knew exactly what to expect. I had spent hours researching the side-effects, then he went and baffled everyone by not only getting every single side-effect on our list, but a few more ‘rarely heard of’ ones just for good measure! Thankfully, he didn’t get them all at the same time, and every cycle was very different. There were bad days and better days, but somehow we coped. I’m certain that you will too. I look forward to reading your ‘all-clear’ post in a few month’s time!

    1. Thanks for posting. I think it’s the part of treatment most people fear because no one can tell them exactly how they will feel. Preparing for the unknown is tricky. I wish your husband well and am sorry to hear he was so plagued by side effects. Your blog is a fascinating and moving insight into your journey. Thanks for sharing. J x

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