Breast cancer lesson number 118: Keep running to that finish line

I have in my possession a blue oncology appointment card on which the words: ‘PICC flush and dressing’ have been written for THE LAST TIME! While it doesn’t actually mean an end to the PICC line (that comes later), it does mean that this time next week there won’t be any more scheduled trips to the hospital just for a shot of saline and a nice clean piece of tubi-grip. I could go as far as to say, this could be my last PICC line flush appointment EVER! But I won’t (just in case).

Ok, so I appreciate this flimsy piece of paper is not much in the looks department. But this card (which the unit lost at my last visit and have only just posted back to me) means a lot to me. For those of you following my #100happydays project, I described it as a reminder of the fact that, whatever race you are running, there will always be a finish line (and if there isn’t, you should ask for a refund on the entry fee!). And, every finish line, however small, is worth celebrating.

Sometimes in life, we are too busy running to make sense of it all. A finish line gives us hope, focus and the reassurance we’ve been running in the right direction all along. I feel like I have been running for my life for the last six months. Reaching the end of a stage (albeit a small one) is a great feeling. It is life’s way of saying the end is in sight and there will come a time when all that is left is you, the memory of an epic struggle and an invisible medal of honour, awarded for just making it through each day.

So whatever it is you’re running for right now, don’t lose sight of the finish line. Enjoy the run if you can, but remember, even if you’re climbing a hill right now, that hill will end – along with the pain.

Who knows? I might have just enough energy in reserve to make the end of the big race a sprint finish!

4 comments

  1. Hooray for you, Jackie! The end of chemo is indeed cause for a huge celebration. You haven’t been running just any old race; this is an Ironman. The medal is in sight:)

  2. This is great. Almost there. My family have a long history of breast cancer. All have reached the finish line and are in good health. Delighted for you.

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